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Seeing the Racial Waters: Robin DiAngelo live at the Clyde Theatre

March 25 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The Whidbey Institute is partnering with others in the community to spread the word about this upcoming event sponsored by The Clyde Theatre and the Whidbey Island Racial Justice Learning Group!  

Due to the volume of interest in this event, the Clyde Theatre is offering advanced tickets at the box office and at Moonrakers Bookstore. Get your free ticket any time, then make your optional donation at the door! 

Childcare is being offered at the South Whidbey Commons back room. Parents should arrive around 12:45 pm.

Ticket Holders must arrive by 12:50 pm, after which time seats will be filled on a first come, first serve basis.

 

Seeing the Racial Waters: A presentation from Robin DiAngelo, Sunday March 25th, 1 to 3 pm at The Clyde

What does it mean to be white in a society that proclaims race meaningless yet is deeply divided by race?

In the face of pervasive racial inequality and segregation, most whites cannot answer that question. Robin DiAngelo explains that a number of factors make this question difficult for whites—miseducation about what racism is; ideologies such as individualism and colorblindness; defensiveness; and tendency to protect (rather than expand) our worldviews. These factors contribute to what she terms white racial illiteracy.

Speaking as a white person to other white people, Dr. DiAngelo clearly and compellingly describes how race shapes the lives of white people, explains what makes racism so hard for whites to see, identifies common white racial patterns, and speaks back to popular white narratives that work to deny racism.

Dr. DiAngelo is a former Associate Professor of Education. She is a two-time winner of the Student’s Choice Award for Educator of the Year from the University of Washington. Her scholarship is in White Racial Identity and Race Relations, and she has extensive experience as a workplace consultant in issues of race relations and racial justice. She was appointed to co-design the City of Seattle’s Race & Social Justice Initiative Training. She has numerous publications and books, including, “What Does it Mean to be White?: Developing White Racial Literacy. Her work on White Fragility has influenced the national dialogue on race and been featured in Alternet, Salon, NPR, PBS, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Slate and Colorlines.

Three follow up conversations in the following weeks will be facilitated by Rose Homme, Diana Sandoval, James DeLong, Janet Staub, Belinda Griswold and Dan McGee.

These conversations will provide space to explore what came up during the talk will be provided at no cost, open to the public. Childcare available. To reserve a spot, email wocwhidbey@gmail.com.

 

Dates and locations of follow-up conversations:

Saturday, 3/31, Healing Circles, Langley, 1 to 4 pm.

Sunday, 4/8, Storyhouse, Whidbey Institute, Clinton, 1 to 4 pm.

Wednesday, 4/18, Freeland Hall, 5:30 to 8:30 pm.

Details

Date:
March 25
Time:
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Event Categories:
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